The Best Cities for New College Graduates

If you remember back, we’ve all had experience working part-time jobs to pay our way through college or university, with prospects of leaving to get a full-time job and pursue a career in something you love or studied at college. However, nowadays, things have changed. Students are finding it difficult to let go of their part-time jobs as the career prospects in the current economic climate are bleak. You see or experience at first hand, the twenty-three year old business studies graduate working as a barman in a local pub unable to find work, the science major folding clothes in the local boutique and the geography graduate living with his parents because he can’t find a teaching job.

Certainly, your prospects are even worse if you only have a high school diploma. It’s not like the olden days where you can pick up a trade or a job on a building site. The unemployment rate for high school graduates age twenty to twenty-five with no college degree under their belts was 18.1% in 2012, compared to 7.5% for those with college degrees in the same year. However it’s still tough out there for recent college graduates with the burden of being unable to pay off their mounting student loans as their part-time wage won’t cover it the repayment expenses. Last year’s graduates are carrying a median of $25,950 in debt. However, it’s not all doom and gloom, wages for new graduates increased slightly in the last year; that is if you are able to find work.

In some cities across the United States, it’s easier for new college graduates to find both a job and affordable rental housing than others. This article will set out statistics and ranking of the most rental listings, compare figures for unemployment, cost of living and average annual wages. It will also illustrate list of ten cities where young grads would be most likely to find housing, work and a reasonable paycheck.

Here are our top ten cities for college graduates, with unemployment and wage figures:

Atlanta, Georgia

Average annual income: $45,500

Median price for a one bedroom apartment: $750

Unemployment rate: 10.9%

Boston, Massachusetts

Mean annual income: $57,750

Average price for a one bedroom apartment: $1,610

Unemployment rate: 6.2%

Dallas, Texas

Average annual income: $45,800

Median price for a one bedroom apartment: $875

Unemployment rate: 6.4%

Denver, Colorado

Mean annual income: $49,900

Average price for a one bedroom apartment: $950

Unemployment rate: 8%

Houston, Texas

Average annual income: $46,900

Median price for a one bedroom apartment: $850

Unemployment rate: 6.1%

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Mean annual income: $50,000

Average price for a one bedroom apartment: $920

Unemployment rate: 5%

Raleigh, North Carolina

Average annual income: $44,900

Median price for a one bedroom apartment: $750

Unemployment rate: 6.7%

Seattle, Washington.

Mean annual income: $55,200

Average price for a one bedroom apartment: $1,250

Unemployment rate: 5.6%

St. Louis, Missouri

Average annual income: $43,900

Median price for a one bedroom apartment: $975

Unemployment rate: 8.6%

Washington, D.C.

Mean annual income: $63,100

Average price for a one bedroom apartment: $1,550

Unemployment rate: 8.4%

To conclude, if you are a recent graduate, looking for work and not living in any of the above cities within the U.S., consider searching employment prospects and accommodation rates online. Classified sites such as Craigslist are a godsend. You never know, you might find your dream job in Minneapolis or even Seattle. Best of luck.